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    Rabindranath Tagore and Iqbal

    Indian poet Iqbal was jealous of poet laureate Rabindranath Tagore because Tagore had won the Nobel Prize. Iqbal was a Urdu poet and Tagore a Bengali poet. National anthems of India and Bangladesh have been penned by Rabindranath Tagore.

    The award complex http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/jun20...2001/lit.htm#2


    Kazy Javed

    Iqbal and Tagore were the most eminent South Asian poets of the first half of the last century. Iqbal belonged to the Punjab and composed poetry in Urdu and Persian languages. Tagore was a Bengali and wrote in his native language. Iqbal's fame mostly remained confined to north India. Tagore, however, had become an international celebrity in his lifetime. In 1913, at the age of 52, he was awarded Nobel Prize for Literature. Older than Iqbal by sixteen years, he outlived him for three years and died in 1941.

    How did the two poets look at each other? What was their opinion of each other? Many critics have raised this question but failed to answer it without parti pris.


    Now one of our notable research scholars M Ikram Chughtai, Director of the Urdu Science Board, has come up with a clear answer based on some new research. The current issue of the Lahore-based monthly Al-Ma'arif carries his revealing article on Iqbal and Tagore.

    Chughtai has presented some interesting details. He tells us that despite being contemporaries and compatriots, the two poets never met each other. They did not even exchange letters. No written proof of a contact between them is traceable. However, it is said that once Tagore, while in Lahore, tried to meet Iqbal. He paid a visit to his Mayo Road residence but Iqbal was absent, gone to Bhopal for his medical treatment. Once back in Lahore, Iqbal perhaps could have written to Tagore and express his regrets. He did not. And there was a reason; Iqbal resented Tagore receiving the Nobel Prize. Chughtai says "Tagore's award had been hovering on Iqbal's mind throughout his life and he, directly or indirectly, could not free himself from this 'award complex'.

    Chughtai has also made a detailed mention of the abortive efforts made by Iqbal and his well-wishers to get a Nobel for him. Soon another development was to take place which was to further sadden the Iqbal: King Raza Shah Pahlavi of Iran extended an invitation to Tagore to visit his country. He went there in 1932. As a royal guest, he was given tremendous welcome in many cities of Iran. While in Tehran, he received a similar invitation from the King of Iraq. In Baghdad, Tagore was received by King Faisal himself.

    Chughtai assures us that Iqbal was greatly 'shocked' by these invitations and warm welcomes extended to a poet who he considered to be his rival. In one of his recently discovered letters, he wrote to Ghulam Abbas Akram, the then foreign minister of Iran, that Tagore was a non-Muslim and that "Tagore did an injustice to the Indian Muslims. He told the Muslims of Mesopotamia to persuade the Indian Muslims to cooperate with the Hindus for the freedom of India."

    Tagore's attitude towards Iqbal was different. It can be felt in his two messages, one sent to Inter-collegiate Muslim Brotherhood of Lahore which celebrated Iqbal Day in January 1937 and the other of condolence on Iqbal's demise in 1938. In these messages the Bengali Nobel Laureate acknowledged Allama's greatness as a poet and universal value of his poetry.

    Against this background, it is not surprising that the compilers and editors of the speeches and statements of Quaid-e-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah have expurgated the Quaid's statement issued on Tagore's death. The Quaid had paid rich tributes to the Bengali writer, saying "I am certainly grieved to hear the sad news of the death of one of the greatest of India's poets, philosophers and social workers. I had the privilege of knowing him from my younger days and the last time I had the honour of meeting him was in London in 1929. His very frank and illuminating discussions were a great source of encouragement. Above all, he was a true patriot and was always ready to understand and appreciate the opposite point of view. In his convocation address to the Gurmukhi University he made very weighty and frank observations about the slogan 'India is one and indivisible' which should be studied by every Indian. "It is an irreparable loss to India. Poet Tagore will live through his works with us".


    #2
    Mohabbat do you ever have any original thoughts or is cut and post your bread and butter.

    tagore's sentiments can be summed up by this sentence

    In these messages the Bengali Nobel Laureate acknowledged Allama's greatness as a poet and universal value of his poetry.


    Comment


      #3
      Hey Mohabbat, Rabindar Naat Tagore was a great poet. There is no doubt that being a Nobel laureate is a great thing, but its not a validation, or invalidation; so i really don't think that Tagore would be any less if he never got a Nobel prize.
      By the way, this is the very first time, I have seen someone comparing these two poets. A comparison never even crossed my mind actually; so I am curious what made you write about this.

      Comment


        #4
        I have read both poets in bits and pieces and cant really give an opinion.

        About literature of both, there have been debates. There are bengali scholars who rate Jivananada Das or likes ahead of Tagore. Similarly, it is not exactly clear if you would rate Iqbal as top of the lot in Urdu.

        Bengal has an emotional attachment of Tagore because Tagore not only wrote poetry, but directed plays, gave music, drew paintings and Shantiniketan has indeed been a highly rated place as far as fine arts in concerned. In fact, Rabindra's music has been so much in Bengali soil that whether it is occasion like Mother Teresa's death or someone's marriage, an apt rabindro song is a must.

        P.L. Deshpande was loved by everyone in Maharshtra. He was not the best writer maharshtra produced, not even best humor writer or best song writer or best musician or actor. He was a bit of all of it and marthis enjoyed it. I think Tagore was like that. He might not be the best writer in Bangla which is one of richest Indian languages but had an enormous contribution to bengali culture.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Rabindranath Tagore and Iqbal

          Originally posted by ZZ View Post
          Bengal has an emotional attachment of Tagore because Tagore not only wrote poetry, but directed plays, gave music, drew paintings and Shantiniketan has indeed been a highly rated place as far as fine arts in concerned. In fact, Rabindra's music has been so much in Bengali soil that whether it is occasion like Mother Teresa's death or someone's marriage, an apt rabindro song is a must.
          .
          Poet of my Punjab
          Hazrat Allama Iqbal
          Our only asset

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Rabindranath Tagore and Iqbal

            Originally posted by Anwer Pasha View Post
            Poet of my Punjab
            Hazrat Allama Iqbal
            Our only asset
            Punjab has lot more assets perhaps a pic would help.
            Attached Files

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Rabindranath Tagore and Iqbal

              Originally posted by mo293 View Post
              Punjab has lot more assets perhaps a pic would help.
              What about Punjab liabilities? How much is in debt, and how much in equity?
              Why isn't the Dividend story among the featured threads?

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Rabindranath Tagore and Iqbal

                Punjab is the cradle of the oldest civilization in the Indus Valley also the birth place of some of the youngest faiths existing in our modern age i.e. Ahmadia and Sikhism!

                and speaking of Allama Iqbal's many accolades our Allama is the one one who coined the word PAKISTAN!
                Balaghal-ula bi-kamaalihi / Kashafad-duja bi-jamaalihi / Hasunat jameeu khisaalihi / Sallu alaihi wa aalihi

                Comment

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