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South Indian restaurant in Karachi

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    South Indian restaurant in Karachi

    Looks like Karachities can now taste Idli Sambar, Masala Dosa, Uttapam, Medu Vada and other mouth watersing dishes of South India.
    http://www.dawn.com/weekly/review/review8.htm

    A taste of South India

    By Shanaz Ramzi

    With Karachi expanding at an alarming pace, and traffic congestion making the life of commuters miserable, the news of a popular shop or restaurant being launched is always welcomed. The latest to join the bandwagon is Ponderosa, which has recently opened its second branch at Sea View after shifting its original restaurant to Mohammed Ali Society.

    With an ambience that is far better and brighter than that of the old Ponderosa at Stadium Road, the new branch is a smaller set-up, comprising just one section of a building devoted to eateries. The ground floor and half the basement constitute Ponderosa, while a branch of the popular ice-cream parlour, The Dip Shop, occupies the first floor. The second floor will be housing a chaat outlet by the name of 'Mirchi', due to open in a few days.

    Ponderosa's decor is quite contemporary - with octagonal wood tables, huge glass windows, glass doors with stained glass simulation, and salmon pink walls - though one does wish that the artificial plants flanking the door would be substituted for real ones. It's a shame that while the view from the upper floors is scenic, the main restaurant overlooks an uninspiring wall, rather than the sea.

    The Dip Shop, on the other hand, is much more spacious than its original counterpart and has a very futuristic decor. With a combination of wooden and colour-crete flooring, false ceiling, and crushed glass tables with copper tube chairs, the ice-cream parlour looks trendy to say the least. Mirchi's decor still remains to be seen, as the place had not opened when this reviewer went to visit the restaurant.

    Ponderosa's menu has shrunk substantially from what used to be offered at the old venue. Gone are the Chinese, Continental and barbecue varieties. Instead, this branch concentrates only on South Indian specialties, becoming the only restaurant in the city exclusively catering to this genre of cuisine. Although most of the fare on offer will appeal to people with a taste for South Indian food, some of the dishes are definitely superior to others. One must make it a point, for instance, to order the cheese pakora and idli for appetisers, as they are both delicious and taste even better with the accompanying South Indian chatnis'. The masala dosa are as scrumptious as ever, but the Mysori dosa, one has to acquire a taste for. With its many chatni forming the filling of the dosa, it has a smell that is not very enticing. The Mughlai and Madrasi thali asre both enjoyable - the former more to the tastes of Pakistanis who can't live without meat, the latter catering to vegetarians.

    The crockery, though melamine, is quite elegant and has been made to order, complete with the small containers holding the individual servings in a thali. The good news is that in spite of the obviously greater overheads this side of the Clifton bridge, the prices are the same as werein the old restaurant - at least so far!

    The Dip Shop has all the varieties of ice creams and toppings available at its original outlet near Schon Circle and also claims to be making the best hot and cold coffee in town.

    Mirchi also promises to be an interesting eatery, the concept behind it being that of a desi fast-food restaurant.

    So for an interesting option of a pot-pourri of South Indian and Pakistani favourites combined with an alternative for those with a sweet tooth, one should head towards Sea View for one's next gastronomical adventure. But make sure you are prepared to climb stairs to enjoy the desi and sweet delights!


    #2
    yeah i went to the original ponderosa thinking it was the local version of the US based ponderosa steak house and was disappointed and did nto stay. Its not to say that south indian food is not good, but I kinda went looking for a NY strip or a T-bone steak and Idli, sambahr and dosa dinn change my cravings.

    The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world he did not exist. And like that... he is gone.

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      #3
      I went to that restaurant in 1997. The food was excellent.
      A samurai bares no sign of weakness, even when dying of hunger.

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        #4
        oye! i have an interesting point. at least i think so. if u think about it before the muslims came to the sub continent, the diet of s.asians were vegetables. hindus and sikhs dont eat meat. it was till the muslims came and intriduced theyre meat dishes. eg. the mughals from turkey intro theyre donar kabab(dont know the correct spl) donar means bread ands kabab-meat. but dont think we're superiopr in any way. we aint. its jusst a point. class in 20 min.

        ------------------
        singing hell to the scenes....

        [This message has been edited by usmansalim (edited September 01, 2000).]

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          #5
          "hindus and sikhs dont eat meat"

          WHAT ??!! Where did you get that idea from ?

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            #6
            Originally posted by usmansalim:
            oye! i have an interesting point. at least i think so. if u think about it before the muslims came to the sub continent, the diet of s.asians were vegetables. hindus and sikhs dont eat meat.

            Some castes in Hindus eat meat. Some dont. Brahmins dont eat meat (traditionally). Bengali Brahmins eat fish though. Bishnois (Vaishnav) dont eat meat and some others.

            Sikhism leaves eating meat to individual choice. However, Guru Govind Singh dev ji forbid Sikhs from eating halal meat, i.e. meat prepared with Muslim prayer. Guru Govind Singh ji hunted. So he definitely ate meat. Bhindranwala was a vegetarian, though. In gurudwaras, food is vegetarian so that anyone should be able to eat.

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              #7
              I am sure South Indian food is very good. can anybody recommend a good recipe?

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                #8
                interesting point zz. i like tht. i was talking abouyt it with mahesh (a friend) it was an interesting discussion. well i go to do laundry

                ------------------
                singing hell to the scenes....

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                  #9
                  >>. hindus and sikhs dont eat meat. it was till the muslims came and intriduced theyre meat dishes<<
                  Usmansanam "Butter Chicken" was invented by Raja Thodaramal, one of the liuetenants of Akbar the Moghul emperor.
                  By the way I hate dragging Religion into everything from eating to shi__ing.

                  As for the food yes.You could observe Indian food scene getting a uniform menu over time.
                  Usually it is south indian breakfast and a mix of South and North for lunch and dinner.

                  I personally feel I am blessed to be born in a country with such a varied cuisine.
                  I would like to start a discussion of food in each and everypart of the subcontinent.
                  Pakistanis may perhaps inform me of this.
                  What is Afghan food like.Is it all lamb or what?
                  I know of an Afghan restaurent in D.C. and am planning to go there.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    afghan food is very delicious. It varies from region to region, just like pakistani or indian food. It has similarities with food in northern areas of Pakistan due to common heritage, but also has similarities with arab and persian food.

                    There was a restaurant in Philly called Kabul. I truly enjoyed the cuisine there.

                    The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was convincing the world he did not exist. And like that... he is gone.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      aaahhhh... read wht i said in the beginning

                      Originally posted by Andhra:
                      >>. hindus and sikhs dont eat meat. it was till the muslims came and intriduced theyre meat dishes<<
                      Usmansanam "Butter Chicken" was invented by Raja Thodaramal, one of the liuetenants of Akbar the Moghul emperor.
                      By the way I hate dragging Religion into everything from eating to shi__ing.

                      As for the food yes.You could observe Indian food scene getting a uniform menu over time.
                      Usually it is south indian breakfast and a mix of South and North for lunch and dinner.

                      I personally feel I am blessed to be born in a country with such a varied cuisine.
                      I would like to start a discussion of food in each and everypart of the subcontinent.
                      Pakistanis may perhaps inform me of this.
                      What is Afghan food like.Is it all lamb or what?
                      I know of an Afghan restaurent in D.C. and am planning to go there.


                      ------------------
                      singing hell to the scenes....

                      Comment


                        #12
                        usmansalim

                        Indian non-vegetarian cusine is very different than middle eastern or Uzbackstan (old Summerkand?) cusine.... Most of the spices used in cooking meat are only found in India...therefore it is logical to assume that these dishes were invented in India rather than borrowed from foreign cultures as suggested by you.

                        P.S. most of middle eastern dishes are bland. Only cooking that come close to Indian cooking is Greek cooking but again that is not middle eastern cooking.

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